ss.mpmn-digital.com
New recipes

Billionaire Grocery Tycoon Offers Bounty for Ice Cream Thieves

Billionaire Grocery Tycoon Offers Bounty for Ice Cream Thieves


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


The owner of Gristedes wants to catch the people who keep stealing his ice cream

Wikimedia/Kanesue

A billionaire New York grocery store tycoon has offered a $5,000 reward for information on the people who keep stealing ice cream from his stores.

Ice cream thieves have been wreaking havoc in New York, and one billionaire grocery store owner is so fed up that he’s put a price on their heads.

According to the New York Post, Gristede’s owner and billionaire John Catsimatidis is offering a $5,000 reward for information on the gang of criminal masterminds who have been running off with all his ice cream.

Earlier this week, a man and a woman somehow made off with 90 cartons of Haagen-Dazs and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream from the Gristedes on 9th Avenue in New York. That couple was caught, but this sort of thing has reportedly been going on for a long time. The ice cream sells for about $6 in grocery stores, but the stolen containers can reportedly be resold to bodegas for 10 cents a container, and the bodegas then reportedly sell it for $5 or so.

Ice cream would not seem like a good product to steal. It melts quickly when it’s hot out, and it is hot out. It’s heavy. It’s cold, and it’s hard to carry. One would think thieves would go after something lighter weight and more uniform in shape, like maybe boxes of tampons, but apparently there is a big secondhand market for stolen ice cream. Catsimatidis says he thinks the thieves have been stealing the ice cream and reselling it to bodegas, which sell it to customers as though it were a legally obtained dessert.

“They keep stealing it because it’s an easy item to sell,’’ Catsimatidis said. “The bodegas buy it. They encourage it.”

The problem with that is the fact that ice cream is hard to transport. It does melt, and when ice cream melts and is refrozen, it can start to harbor unpleasant bacteria. Even if that does not happen, the refreezing can cause the ice cream to get ice crystals and cease to be creamy and delicious.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Food 1929-1941

Many scenes of parents, children, and others struggling daily to gather enough food to eat played out during the lean years of the Great Depression. After the stock market crash of 1929, the American economy plummeted. Thousands of people lost their jobs. At this point in U.S. society, most families relied on the man to work and provide a source of income, while the mother cared for children and the household. With many men now out of work, it often became difficult for families to support themselves. Parents struggled to cut corners to make ends meet. Men, women, and at times even children, took on what jobs they could find and used all the means available to them to stretch their resources to their limits.

Imagine being the teenage son in a West Virginia coal miner's family. Your dad lost his job more than a year ago. You take turns with your sister eating, meaning you eat every other day. You hunt for dandelions on the hills with your mother. Dandelions, cornmeal cakes, and hog lard can make a feast. You worry about your dad, who has been unable to find another job and seems to have lost hope.

An unemployed factory worker and father during the Depression may have stayed away from home at mealtime so as not to eat the food his children needed. Instead, he may have gone to wait patiently in a breadline with hundreds of other men for a meal of soup, bread, and coffee. He and those waiting with him had no thought of turning the line into a protest demonstration. Many men felt that they were responsible for providing for their families, and some may even have felt that they were to blame for the problems that had befallen them.

A middle-class mother whose family income was greatly reduced due to the Depression still needed to find ways to provide her family with satisfying meals that fulfilled basic food needs. She would "make do" using a limited number of foodstuffs kept in the pantry, grown in the garden, or perhaps obtained from the local butcher or even a chain food store. Creative cooks could make a pot roast last as a base for meals for the entire week. Meal portions were stretched with the inclusion of gravy, potatoes, biscuits, and macaroni. Newly famous cooks and their cookbooks, such as Fannie Farmer's The Boston Cooking School Cookbook and Irma Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking, helped mothers and others struggling to put food on the table plan simple, nutritious meals. It was not uncommon for families to invite those less fortunate for Sunday dinner.

Imagine that you are a grandfather or grandmother who works diligently growing food in the garden and canning in the kitchen to help out your family. The colorful array of fruit and vegetable jars lined up on the pantry shelves is a constant source of pride for you through the winter months. You are thankful you do not live in the Midwest Dust Bowl, where gardens are drying up.

Chronology:

Stories like these played out across America during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Breadlines, "making do," and subsistence gardens were all part of the Depression food culture. Most families—the 70 to 75 percent that still had income—were able to "make do," but the faces and stories of the desperately hungry made lasting impressions on all Americans. As quickly as it could, the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (served 1933–1945) created government relief agencies to distribute surplus farm foods to the needy. Food programs stemming from the creation of these relief agencies persist into the twenty-first century. Food Stamps and the protections of the Food and Drug Administration are two examples of programs that sprung from events of the 1930s Depression.

Breadlines, relief agencies, and "making do," however, were not the whole story of the struggle for sustenance during the Depression. A host of new processed foods were introduced during the decade. The American entrepreneur, always ready to try something new in hopes of making more money for a better living, developed inexpensive, quality foods such as meat in a can. Fun, cheap snacks, such as fried corn chips or spongy little cakes with a filling, were also created. Increasing numbers of food chain stores stocked the mass-marketed, processed foods. Food entrepreneurs became millionaires during the Depression, and people searching to get the most out of what money they had were able to purchase inexpensive foods.

The short and long term health implications of those unemployed and eating at soup kitchens, or even for those simply cutting back on some necessities to make budgets stretch, has been little explored or recorded. Larger health concerns came from the poor sanitary conditions in overcrowded city slums and rural shanties. Nutrition actually improved for those who could still afford the new innovations for the kitchen, such as modern refrigerators and the new products available in the markets. Perhaps the most lasting legacy of the 1930s for most Americans was their diligence in eating every last bite on their plate.


Watch the video: she wasnt fast enough.