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Paskha (Russian Easter dessert) recipe

Paskha (Russian Easter dessert) recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Cake
  • Cheesecake

This a recipe for a traditional Russian Easter dessert (paskha), except I substituted the traditional candied fruit with jelly sweets.

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 5

  • 500g twarog or quark
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 100g butter
  • 200g double cream
  • 250g mixed jelly sweets, plus more for garnish

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:15min ›Extra time:5hr resting › Ready in:5hr25min

  1. Press twarog through a sieve, or pulse in a food processor.
  2. In a saucepan beat eggs with vanilla and sugar; add cream and heat over low heat until thickened, about 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool for a few minutes; add chopped jelly sweets and mix well.
  3. Add chopped jelly sweets; mix well.
  4. Use a special Easter cake tin, or line a small colander, with several layers of muslin cheese cloth. Spoon the mixture into it and place a heavy plate on top to weigh it down.
  5. Set over a bowl to catch the liquid and refrigerate for several hours.
  6. Remove from the fridge. Carefully unmould the pashka and remove the cheesecloth. Decorate with sliced jelly sweets.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)


Recipe Summary

  • 2 pounds fresh farmer cheese, room temperature
  • 6 egg yolks, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 3 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon grated fresh nutmeg
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped candied citron or lemon peel
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • Assorted dried fruits, for decorating (optional)

Press cheese through a medium strainer set over a bowl.

Using a mixer with the whisk attachment, whisk yolks with sugar on high speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Reduce speed to medium add cheese, butter, nutmeg, zest, and peel and mix until very smooth. Still mixing, add cream in a slow, steady stream just until combined. Stir in vanilla.

Line a 5 1/2-by-7-inch paskha mold, flowerpot, or strainer with dampened cheesecloth add batter. Fold cheesecloth over top. Top with two stacked plates weighted with 2 to 3 cans (or 2 to 3 pounds of pie weights). Place filled mold over a wide, empty cooking pot in refrigerator let drain overnight.

Remove weights and plate pull back cheesecloth from base. Carefully invert mold onto a serving plate and remove paskha remove cheesecloth. Decorate with dried fruits serve.


Easter recipes: Kulich Paskha

Kulich is a traditional Russian Easter dish, popular also among Orthodox people. This is an authentic recipe.

200 ml whole milk
25 g fresh yeast
450 – 500 g flour
200 ml sugar
4 egg yolks
3 – 4 egg whites
100 g almonds + some for garnishing
¼ tsp salt
150 g butter
(1 tsp vanilla sugar)
pinch of saffron threads
½ – 1 tbsp vodka

Mix saffron with vodka and let stand, preferably overnight. The aroma and colour of saffron will dissolve into the vodka. Bring the milk, eggs and butter to room temperature. Scald, peel, dry and finely grate the almonds.

Dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm milk. Add 200 ml flour, mix and let rise in a warm place. The batter will start to “bubble” during rising.

Beat the egg yolks, 150 millilitres of sugar and vanilla sugar until pale and fluffy. Beat the egg whites until stiff, add the rest of the sugar (50 ml) while beating.

When the bubbly surface of the batter starts to descend, add the salt, the yolk mixture, the egg whites, the strained vodka, the grated almonds and the softened butter. Add enough flour to get a batter much thinner than regular yeast dough. The batter must not be too thick or hard (see figure 1 below).

Line the bottom and sides of a tall, cylindrical cake mould with (buttered) parchment paper. You will probably need at least two moulds. If you do not have a mould tall enough (about 15 – 20 cm), you can use any regular, large soufflé mould and line it with parchment paper so that the paper forms a tall rim above the mould (the way it is done in figures 2 and 3).


Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 3

Fill ¼ of the moulds with the batter (see figure 2), cover with plastic or a towel and let the batter rise until it fills ¾ of the moulds (see figure 3). Garnish the batter surface with blanched whole almonds (see figure 3) and bake at 175 °C for about 40 minutes. Watch the surface while baking. If it is getting very dark, cover it with foil to prevent it from burning. The kulichi are done, when a cake tester/toothpick inserted in the middle of them comes out clean.

Let the kulichi cool down in their moulds and then very carefully take them out and put on a wire rack. When kulichi are cool and firm, carefully slice them crosswise into disks, cut to wedges and serve spread with paskha (see the pictures below).

In picture on right: paskha on a slice of kulich.

Cutting and slicing of kulich

Cut off the top Cut kulich in
horizontal slices
Cut slices in wedges

Place the top back on and wrap in plastic

Paskha — pronounced [PAHS-khuh] — is a traditional Russian Easter dish, a kind of sweet cheese mould. It is made of quark , egg yolks, sugar, butter and smetana or cream and flavoured with vanilla.

The ingredients are mixed together — sometimes cooked — and poured into a special wooden or plastic pyramid-shaped paskha mould lined with cheesecloth (see picture below). The mould is placed in cold for the mixture to set before unmoulding. Paskha is eaten spread on a slice of traditional sweet yeast bread kulich .

Sometimes paskha can be flavoured with chocolate, nuts, raisins, candied citrus peel or dried fruit, although a “real”, authentic paskha never contains these flavourings.

During the great Easter fast of the Orthodox church, it is forbidden to eat meat, eggs, butter or other dairy products.

On Easter Sunday, when the fast has ended, it is again allowed to eat these “forbidden” ingredients and this is why many of the Russian Easter dishes contain lots of eggs, butter, cream etc. In old agrarian society, making paskha was a way of using up all the eggs and dairy products that had piled up during the fast.

RUSSIAN EASTER PASKHA

There are many variations to this basic paskha recipe, some of them adding various extra flavourings in the mixture, like chopped almonds or nuts, raisins, fresh, canned or candied fruit, cocoa, chocolate etc.

However, recipes like those are deeply frowned upon by most Finnish families with old Russian and Orthodox heritage, including mine. Mixed in the dish, the nuts feel like pebbles and the fruit and bloated raisins (yuck!) like unpleasant, slimy lumps, ruining the smooth, creamy texture and the delicate taste of paskha.

500 g firm quark
2 egg yolks
200 g sugar
4 tsp vanilla sugar
*)
200 g unsalted butter
(whipped cream)

Preferably use quark with a high fat content (about 7 – 15 %). Wrap the quark in cheesecloth, hang it over the sink or a bowl and strain for several hours at cool room temperature — or overnight in the refrigerator — so that the extra liquid (whey) comes out, making the quark firmer. This is an important step, especially if you are using a soft and watery Finnish-type quark. (The whey may be used as liquid in making bread dough, pancakes or other batters.)

Melt the butter and let it cool down thoroughly. Stir the drained quark until smooth. Mix the egg yolks, sugar and vanilla sugar with the quark. Beat the mixture with an electric mixer to make it very fluffy and smooth. Add the melted, cooled butter in the mixture, beating thoroughly. It is very important to let the butter cool before adding it in the mixture, otherwise it will cause the other ingredients to melt, making the mixture too runny. To give the paskha an even softer taste, some whipped cream may be folded into the mixture as well.

After thoroughly mixed, pour the mixture into a special pyramid-shaped paskha-mould lined with a layer of thin, clean cheesecloth dampened with boiling water (see pictures below). In lack of a traditional paskha-mould, you can use some other suitable dish — a fine round or conical strainer lined with cheesecloth, for example. Cover the top with cheesecloth and place a light weight on.


Fill the lined mould
with quark mixture

Cover with
cheesecloth

Place a light
weight on top

Place the paskha-mould in refrigerator for overnight, letting the extra liquid run out into a bowl underneath the mould (see pictures above). The longer you strain the quark in advance, the less liquid will come out of the final paskha, resulting in a firmer, more even-shaped dessert.

On the next day, uncover the paskha mould and place a serving platter on top of it. Holding the platter firmly against the mould, turn the mould and the platter upside down. Open the mould and carefully remove it, letting the paskha slide on the platter. Gently peel off the cheesecloth from the surface.

Store the unmoulded paskha in refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap. It will keep for a few days. Paskha is traditionally served spread thickly on a slice of kulich – a special Russian Easter cake.

In picture on right: paskha on a slice of kulich.

Note: instead of kulich, you may serve Italian panettone bread or some other rich, soft and flavourful sweet yeast bread with paskha.

*) Never use vanilla extracts or essences to flavour paskha. Because the essences are made by steeping vanilla pods in alcohol, they always give a strong, bitter taste of alcohol to the paskha mixture, overpowering the very delicate taste of sweetened quark.
The quality of the essence/extract has no significance, even the best products will ruin the dish.


A Delightful Russian Easter Dessert, Paskha

Each year as spring arrives with its bouquets of daffodils and hyacinths, its early tulips and clear sunshine, faithful Christians begin to celebrate the Easter season. The celebration takes on different guises, but it almost always includes fasting, eschewing rich foods in order to focus on more spiritual subjects. As Easter approaches, cooks get busy. And I am no exception.

Aside from the religious significance of Easter, this holiday has always represented the new, the hopeful, the emergence from winter’s short days to longer, sun-filled days. Easter Sunday is occasion for a festive brunch that celebrates all the new foods of the season. Depending on where you live and the date of Easter which changes each year, those foods might be strawberries and asparagus, tender new lettuces, thin new onions and garlic. And there are eggs in abundance and, if you’re oriented eastwards, the marvelous pudding like cake called paskha, or pasha.

Almost a cheesecake, paskha is traditionally made with a farmers’ like cheese that is freshly made and has the clear scent of cream. I make mine with either full-fat fromage blanc or yogurt, which too have their dairy-flavor integrity intact. Ideally, paskha is near-purely white, to represent the purity of the risen Christ, which is achievable with the recipe below, for it is light on butter, and on egg yolks! But of course, recipes for paskha abound, each with its own twist. I love this one, which is studded with pistachios, almonds, orange zest, and dates.

Traditionally, paskha is served with kulich, a dried-fruit filled bread. Because I have a blended-culture home, my sweet breads of choice are kougelhopf at one end of the table, hot cross buns at the other. Both have either raisins or dried currants, each has its own distinct flavor, and both are perfect foils for paskha.

Paskha is simple to make. Most versions including mine require no cooking, but just some waiting time, for the mixture has to drain in the refrigerator overnight. Please try it, and once it is unmolded on a serving plate, decorate as you see fit. You’ll fall in love with both the flavor and texture of paskha, and it will forever more find a place on your Easter brunch table!


Paskha (Russian Easter dessert) recipe - Recipes

Note that Finnish eggs are among the safest in the world to be eaten uncooked. To find out why, read here.

Paskha  —  пасха in Russian, meaning "Easter"  —  is an old traditional Russian Easter dessert. In Finland, the name of this dessert is frequently mispronounced by the ignorant Finns as [ˈpaʃʃa], instead of the proper pronunciation, which is [ˈpasha] (using IPA).

There are many variations to this basic paskha recipe, some of them adding various extra flavourings in the mixture, like chopped almonds or nuts, raisins, fresh, canned or candied fruit, cocoa, chocolate etc.

However, recipes like those are deeply frowned upon by all Finnish families with old Russian and Orthodox heritage, like mine. Mixed in the dish, the pieces of fruit and nuts feel like pebbles, and the bloated raisins like unpleasant, slimy lumps, ruining the smooth, creamy texture and the delicate taste of sweetened quark.

To produce the correct flavour, only unsalted butter must be used in making paskha. Using salted butter is a fault found in many Finnish recipes.

Note: there are several types of quarks, with soft or firm texture, low or high fat content, etc, and two types of paskha  —  cooked and uncooked. In uncooked paskha, the ingredients are simply mixed and poured in a mould to set.
In cooked paskha, the ingredients are extremely gently and briefly heated in a saucepan or double boiler before pouring in the mould. Cooked paskha keeps a bit longer than uncooked paskha.
Soft, watery quark is suitable to be used in both cooked and uncooked recipes, but it has to be drained of its excess liquid before use. It produces the smoothest paskha.
Firm, dry quark has a harder, grainy texture, and must be rubbed through a fine sieve or beaten thoroughly with a heavy-duty tabletop mixer fitted with a sturdy beater attachment or mixed in a food mixer to make it as smooth as possible (in my family, we have found the latter method to work best). Dry quark is suitable to be used in both cooked and uncooked recipes.
The fat content of the quark used is rather irrelevant, although the fattiest quarks will of course produce the most flavourful paskha!
And remember: there is NO such thing as "low-fat paskha"  —  after all, Easter comes only once a year :-)

See additional information about paskha and kulich.

Preferably use quark with a high fat content (about 7 - 30 %). Wrap the quark in cheesecloth, hang it over the sink or a bowl and strain for several hours at cool room temperature  —  or overnight in the refrigerator  —  so that the extra liquid (whey) comes out, making the quark firmer. The whey may be used as liquid in making bread dough, pancakes or other batters.

Straining the quark is an important step, especially if you are using Finnish quark, which is very soft and watery. Note that drier, firm and hard quark is not suitable to be used in this recipe because it will result in a grainy texture  —  see the above note (in italics).

Depending on the liquid content of the type of quark you are using, you should have about 400 grams (between 380 and 420 grams, or thereabouts) of drained quark.

Melt the butter and let it cool down thoroughly. Stir the drained quark until smooth. Mix the egg yolks, sugar and vanilla sugar with the quark. Beat the mixture with an electric mixer to make it very fluffy and smooth. Add the melted, cooled butter in the mixture slowly in thin stream, beating thoroughly. It is very important to let the butter cool before adding it in the mixture, otherwise it will cause the other ingredients to melt, making the mixture too runny. To give the paskha an even softer taste, some whipped cream may be folded into the mixture as well.

After thoroughly mixed, pour the mixture into a special pyramid-shaped paskha-mould lined with a layer of thin, clean cheesecloth dampened with boiling water (see pictures below). In lack of a traditional paskha-mould, you can use some other suitable dish  —  a fine round or conical strainer lined with cheesecloth, for example. Cover the top with cheesecloth and place a light weight on.

Fill the lined mould
with quark mixture


Cover with
cheesecloth

Place a light
weight on top

Place the paskha-mould in refrigerator overnight, letting the extra liquid run out into a bowl underneath the mould (see pictures above). The longer you strain the quark in advance, the less liquid will come out of the final paskha, resulting in a firmer, more even-shaped dessert.

On the next day, uncover the paskha mould and place a serving platter on top of it. Holding the platter firmly against the mould, turn the mould and the platter upside down. Open the mould and carefully remove it, letting the paskha slide on the platter. Gently peel off the cheesecloth from its surface.

In picture on right: paskha on a slice of kulich.

Store the unmoulded paskha in refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap. It will keep for up to a week, but should preferably be eaten within a few days.

Paskha is traditionally served spread thickly on a slice of kulich, a special Russian Easter cake.

Note: instead of kulich, you may serve Italian Easter or Christmas breads, colomba pasquale or panettone, or some other rich, soft and flavourful sweet yeast bread with paskha.

In picture on right: colomba pasquale.

*) Never use vanilla extracts or essences to flavour paskha. Because the essences are made by steeping vanilla pods in alcohol, they always give a strong, bitter taste of alcohol to the paskha mixture, overpowering the very delicate taste of sweetened quark.
The quality of the essence/extract has no significance, even the best products will ruin the dish. Also low-quality vanilla sugars, like Oetker (Dr. Oetker) "Natural Vanilla Sugar", and the like, must be avoided.


10 VERY beautiful Easter desserts from Russia (PHOTOS)

It is said that kulich should never be cooked in a hurry or in a bad mood. According to traditional recipes, the dough takes time to &ldquorise&rdquo several times. The Magadan restaurant, for instance, takes around 12 hours to prepare the cake. Decorate with icing, chocolate and Easter pryaniki.

2. Chocolate kulich

Moscow&rsquos famous Cafe Pushkin decided to place the dessert inside a chocolate frame. All you have to do is select your preference: white or dark.

3. Snow-white meringue

This cake from the Buro.Tsum cafe captures hearts and mouths with its airy meringue decoration. The curves of the ribbon glaze accommodate marzipan eggs, golden sugar and violets. The dough is based on Italian panettone with candied and dried fruits, including raisins, plus milk and caramel chocolate.

4. Faberge-style chocolate eggs

Cafe Pushkin has also come up with a whole collection of chocolate eggs made to resemble the legendary Easter eggs of the Carl Faberge jewelry company. Exquisite craftsmanship by master chocolatiers.

5. Kulichwith gold and raspberries

These tall, luxurious kulich cakes with a delicate honey-vanilla aroma are served at the Sybarite restaurant. They are decorated with nasturtium leaves and raspberries, or with gilded almonds, velour and gold leaf.

6. Easter pryaniki

Honey and ginger pryaniki (spice cakes) with sugar fondant, made in the form of Easter bunnies and eggs, are the Eastertide specialty of the Zhemchuga cafe.

7. Curd paskha

The classic Russian Easter dish known as curd paskha is shaped like a truncated pyramid and symbolizes the Holy Sepulcher. The version made by the Drinks&Dinners restaurant is prepared with custard, candied fruit and raisins, and served on a pistachio base. A little chocolate, nuts and candied fruits for decoration round off the dessert nicely.

8. Easter cake

An ornate Easter cake is an unusual, but elegant solution for Orthodox Easter. At Coffeemania, the cake is decorated with a bird&rsquos nest with eggs.

9. Kulichwith lemon filling

For Easter, the Georgian-cuisine Mziuri restaurant bakes cakes from curd dough with poppy seeds, filled with lemon cream. A delicious meringue is placed temptingly on top.

10. Kulichwith dried flowers

At the Shinok restaurant, kulich is prepared according to age-old recipes with candied fruits and raisins, decorated with glaze and dried flower petals. These were traditionally used to decorate kulich (and the home for Easter), since fresh flowers at this time of the year had not yet blossomed.

READ MORE: Cruffin kulich: A modern take on an iconic Russian Easter pastry (RECIPE)

If using any of Russia Beyond's content, partly or in full, always provide an active hyperlink to the original material.


Paskha, Easter curd pudding

Soak the raisins in filtered water for 15 minutes or for 1 hour, depending on the dryness of the raisins. Then put in a colander and dry. Cut candied fruits into small neat cubes, if necessary. Rub the curd through a sieve into a saucepan in order to get rid of lumps and small grains and make it completely smooth. You can also mince the curd twice or blend. Soften the butter to room temperature. Grate sugar with yolks and softened butter thoroughly or whip with a mixer to a fluffy mass. Then add sour cream to the curd and whip. Put the butter mass and whip again. Add vanilla seeds to the curd mass and rub it through a sieve into a small pot. Put this pot on a large saucepan filled with low boiling water by one third. Warm the curd mass to the first bubbles, constantly stirring so that the mass does not exfoliate. Then remove the pan from the water-bath. Cool the curd mass and refrigerate for 1-2 hours so that it hardens a bit. Add raisins, candied fruits and lemon peel, and stir carefully. Cover the inside of the paskha tin with gauze, place the curd mass and put some tightening weight atop (a liter jar half full with water). Refrigerate for 3 days. Place the tin in a deep dish so that the liquid drains off. Before serving, remove the tin and gauze, put paskha on a festive dish and put in the very center of a bright Easter table.


Russian Easter Paskha

Traditional Russian Easter paskha, a festive dish made of cottage cheese (tvorog), butter, dried fruits and vanilla.This paskha recipe is healthy and incredibly delicious.

Ingredients

  • 2-¼ cups Cottage Cheese
  • ⅓ cups Raisins (or Other Dried Fruits, Chopped If Needed)
  • ½ Lemon, Zest And Juice
  • 1 Vanilla Pod
  • ½ cups Brown Sugar
  • ½ cups Unsalted Butter, At Room Temperature
  • 1 cup Mascarpone
  • 3 Tablespoons Chopped Almonds (or Other Nuts), To Garnish
  • 2 teaspoons Sugar Pearls, To Garnish

Preparation

Lay out cheesecloth over a strainer, put cottage cheese on it and knot the ends or use a rubber band to secure the cheesecloth. Hang it over a bowl for 2 hours.

Meanwhile, mix raisins with lemon zest and juice in a small bowl. Slice vanilla pod lengthwise and scrape the seeds with a teaspoon. Add them to the raisins. In a separate large bowl, combine brown sugar with butter.

When cottage cheese it ready, squeeze it well to get extra moisture out. Add raisin mixture, mascarpone and cottage cheese to the bowl with butter and stir well until combined. Put paskha back in the cheesecloth and secure the ends as before. Hang it over a bowl overnight.

When ready, you will have about 110 ml or 1/2 cup of moisture in a bowl. Use it for other dishes, like pancakes or bread. Use a strainer as a mold. Put the opened cheesecloth with paskha in a strainer, press down with the plate on top, turn over and remove the strainer and the cheesecloth. Decorate with chopped almonds or other nuts, sugar pearls, candles, flowers, candid fruits or as desired. Enjoy!

Note: The active cooking time is just 20 minutes. Paskha has to be drained for 2 hours plus overnight.


What Makes This Paskha (russian Cheesecake) Recipe Better?

The answer is simple, Simplicity, Foolproof, Straightforward, and Tested. Yes, all recipes have been tested before posting including this Paskha (russian Cheesecake).

Ready to make this Paskha (russian Cheesecake) Recipe? Let’s do it!

Oh, before I forget…If you’re looking for recipes that are simple to follow, then we’ve got your back. With over 55,000 recipes in our database, we’ve got the best recipes you’re craving for.

CHEESECAKE
6 c Farmers Cheese 3 Lbs, * 6 ea Egg Yolks Large
1 1/2 c Confectioners’ Sugar 1 1/2 c Heavy Cream
1/2 c Candied Fruits 1/2 c Raisins Seedless
1/2 c Almonds Toasted, Slivered 1/2 ts Lemon Rind Grated
1/2 lb Butter NO Margarine 3 ts Vanilla Extract

SABAYON SAUCE
2 ea Egg Yolks Large 1/4 c Madeira
1/2 ts Lemon Rind Grated 3 tb Confectioners’ Sugar
1 tb Lemon Juice 1 tb Rum Light

* You can also use Large-Curd Cottage Cheese if the Farmers Cheese is
——
NOTE: THIS IS A SPECIAL CAKE REQUIRING A NEW LARGE FLOWER POT 7 X 7-INCHES
AT A MINIMUM. Press the cheese through a sieve. Combine the cheese with the
egg yolks, beating in 1 yolk at a time. Add the sugar and blend well. Heat
the cream in a large saucepan until it almost boils, then add the cheese
mixture and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture
thickens. Remove from the heat before it begins to boil. Stir in the
fruits, almonds, and lemon rind. Cool. Cream together the butter and the
vanilla, then stir into the cooled cheese mixture. Line the flower pot
with several layers of moistened cheesecloth, leaving enough cloth at the
top to form a flap that will cover the pot. Fill the pot with the cheese
mixture and cover with the flap. Put a weight on the top and place in the
refrigerator for 2 to 3 days. The whey (liquid) will drip out the bottom
of the pot, so be sure to place a pan under it. When drained, carefully
unmold the cake with a knife. Remove the cheesecloth and smooth the sides
with a hot knife. Prepare the sauce. Beat together the egg yolks, sugar,
Madeira, and lemon rind in the top of a double boiler. Cook and continue
beating until the mixture thickens. Stir in the lemon juice and the rum,
then chill briefly. Pour the sauce over the cheesecake and serve. NOTE:
This very unusual cheesecake is a traditional Russian Easter dish. In the
old days, the custom was to decorate it with paper flowers or religious
emblems and have the priest come by and bless it. Back then, it was made
in a special pyramid-shaped form, but you can make it in an ordinary red
clay flower pot. Visually, the effect is quite striking, and the drainage
hole allows the excess whey to escape. To make paskha, you will need a
large flower pot and some cheesecloth. The paskha will keep in the
refrigerator for several weeks, but be sure to make it at least three days
in advance.

Yields
10 servings


Related Video

A traditional dish of the Eastern Orthodox Church, especially common among Russians. Great traditional a dish passed down from one generation to the next. Complement any Easter celebration with an original and rare sweetness, which many may like. I bought my Easter mold from this etsy seller paintingamazingworld

PERFECT PASKHA! Followed the recipe with very few variations and it came out perfect. The whole family enjoyed it for Orthodox Easter. Substituted monk fruit sugar for regular sugar, Greek yogurt for sour cream and cottage cheese (well drained) for farmers cheese, and added slivered almonds. Was fortunate to have one of Toroney’s Custom Woodwork and Church Supply paskha molds. They’re beautifully made and can be passed down to new generations of paskha makers. This will now become my go-to recipe for paskha from now on. Many thanks.

Having read the reviews, I felt compelled to share my experience in reference to paskha. To start with, my parents were Russian, and my mom would prepare the traditional kulich (cousin to the Italian panettone) and paskha, the taste of which resembles that of New York style cheesecake. Since farmer's cheese was unavailable, she would use cottage cheese, draining it of excess moisture by wrapping it in cheesecloth, and weighting it down with a heavy pot, or can. The cheese would drain for 2 to 3 hours. Checking with wikipedia, I found out that farmer's cheese is pressed cottage cheese! Queso blanco is a little bit saltier and I would not use. To the person that did not care for the eggy taste, I can only say that in my recipe, I use 4 egg yolks, not cooked as in this recipe (I imagine it has to do with avoiding possible contamination from using raw yolks). Also I do not use sour cream. Unfortunately, the changes in the Gourmet recipe do affect somewhat the final texture and flavor.

Okay, I've never eaten this before, so I really had no expectations, but I thought it was pretty good. For those who can't find farmer's cheese, Queso Blanco is an equivalent, and is much more prevalent in the grocery stores in my area. I think if I made it again, I would add a few different types of dried fruit. Also I might try combining the cheese and egg in the food processor--it was a little crumbly/grainy with the ricer. I would also make a half batch--I didn't comprehend that this recipe is pretty huge. I was just making it as an appetizer spread so I got to eat leftovers for a very long time--but that being said, it seemed to get better with age, so you could definitely make it a few days in advance.

I have been making this recipe every year since it first came out in Gourmet 2004 for my Ukrainian Canadian husband. I am Chinese American. I could not find Farmer's cheese but find that ricotta cheese works just as well and leaves very little liquid to drain. My husband who likes to do woodworking made a wooden Paskha mold for me just like the one in the photo, so bringing this cheese for the Paskha bread each Easter to church has become our family tradition. I really think the brandy-soaked raisins make this spread extraordinarily decadent.

This was the first time I tried to recreate a childhood memory. The results tasted authentic to me. This will become an Easter tradition for us.

Has anyone made this without the eggs. I just made it and it came out good but I can definitely taste the eggs a bit--when my Russian grandmother made it, it was much more creamy, a little sweeter and didn't have any sort of egg taste. Other than that I am pretty impressed with this recipe and my first try at Russian Easter! I will bake the Kulich tonight--hoping it comes out well. Happy Easter!

I have made this recipe since I discovering it in the April 2004 issue of Gourmet. It was found at a time when I was frustelrated with the pasckha recipes I have tried. Personally, I have eliminated the raisens (my husband does not like raisens) it is a wonderful recipe that resembles a crustless cheesecake isn't too "eggy"which was my objection to the other recipes I have tried.

I have only used my mother's recipe which was passed down from my grandmother. My mom used maraschino cherries instead of raisins. And Farmer cheese is also known as pot cheese, so try looking for that also. By the way, this is great when you spread it on the Kulich!!

Is Bakers cheese the same as Farmers cheese? I used Bakers as it looks exactly the same, soft..white. I found I did not care for the taste of this at all. It was completly hit or miss with my family. It was very bitter with a distinctive after taste. Since I am unsure if bakers cheese is the same I am not sure if that flavor is excpected. I otherwise followed the recipe exactly. I was very disappointed .

Pashka must be the Russian version of Tiramisu - every cook's is a bit different. My mother if Baltic German (born in Riga) and makes a very similar version to this recipe, except she uses black currants instead of raisins - and it is delicious!

I haven't made this recipe either I think every family has its own secret recipe! But here's another hint: my mother always makes her Pascha well in advance and freezes it. It freezes beautifully and only needs 3-4 hours to thaw (i.e. she takes it out of the freezer before going to church on Easter night).

A hint (or confession, however you wish to read it): rather than using my husband's grandmother's pascha mold, I sometimes put the cheese mixture into a cheesecloth-lined colandar set over a small bowl to drain. This would be an easy way for those new to the recipe to test it out. And it really is delicious - somewhat akin to a crustless cheesecake.

I have not made this recipe from this site but would like to share a family secret recipe for Cheese Pascha - aka "Russian Ice Cream". You can use half this recipe because it makes alot. Ingredients: 1/2 lb. unsalted sweet butter 2 1/2 lbs. Farmer's cheese 1 pint heavy cream 1-2 stick vanilla bean (sliced open lengthwise) 3/4 lb sugar squares 1/2 cup white raisins 1/2 cup blanched almonds chopped fine 1/2 cup red cherries, chopped and drained. cheese cloth, mold or Flower pots. Directions: Cook vanilla bean, cream and sugar over low heat. Stir constantly and cook over very low heat 20 minutes after boiling. Consistency should be creamy and thick. Cool. Strain farmer's cheese (I use a potato ricer). Whip butter and cheese together until fluffy. Beat until blended smoothly. Add almonds, cherries, raisins. Moisten cheesecloth in cold water. Place in flower pot. Pour mixture into molds or flower pots. Refrigerate for 12 hours or more. A weight can be placed on top of mold to help drain.


Watch the video: Paskha For Russian Orthodox EasterТворожная Царская Пасха, Заварная