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Hamantaschen

Hamantaschen


Notes

I find that whole poppy seeds have a bitter quality when used in this quantity, which is why they need to be ground. Because I like a slight crunch, I heat the poppy seeds only for a short time. For a smoother poppy seed paste, in a poppy seed grinder, spice mill, or blender, grind ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon poppy seeds. (There will be about ¾ cup.) Place the ground poppy seeds in a small saucepan. In place of the milk, add ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot water to the poppy seeds. Cook over low heat, stirring often, for about 3 to 6 minutes. The poppy seeds will gradually absorb the water, swelling and becoming more paste-like. Add water, by the tablespoon, as needed, to keep the paste from scorching. When the poppy seed paste has the consistency of peanut butter, remove it from the heat and add the sugar, honey, and lemon zest. Cool completely. (There will be a little less than ¾ cup; use 1½ teaspoons per cookie.)

Poppy seed paste can be stored in an airtight container in the freezer for several months.

If using apricot preserves instead of lekvar, place about ¼ cup apricot preserves in a microwavable container and bring it to a boil in the microwave. Alternatively, place it in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over medium-low heat on a cooktop, stirring constantly. Using the back of a spoon, push it through a fine-mesh strainer into a small bowl, and discard the small amount of pulp.

Highlights for Success

Poppy seeds have a high oil content and are therefore prone to rancidity, especially if purchased already ground. When poppy seeds start to become rancid, they taste very bitter. Store both whole and ground poppy seeds in the freezer. If you are purchasing ground poppy seeds, and don’t have a scale, measure out ¾ cup.

The best way to grind poppy seeds is in a specially designed poppy seed grinder. A spice mill or blender will work, but not quite as well — a food processor not at all.

Apricot Lekvar Filling (Makes 2¾ cups)

2⅔ cups dried apricots

2 cups water

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar

2 teaspoons loosely packed, finely grated lemon zest

1 teaspoon apricot or peach brandy

In a medium saucepan with a tight-fitting lid, combine the dried apricots and water and let them sit for 2 hours to soften.

Bring the water to a boil, cover the pan tightly, and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes on the lowest possible heat until the apricots are very soft when pierced with a skewer. If the water evaporates, add a little extra.

In a food processor, process the apricots and any remaining liquid, the sugar, lemon zest, and brandy until smooth.

Scrape the apricot mixture back into the saucepan and simmer, stirring constantly to prevent scorching, for 10 to 15 minutes, or until deep orange in color and very thick. When lifted, a tablespoon of the mixture will take about 3 seconds to fall from the spoon.

Transfer the lekvar to a bowl and let it cool completely. You will need only about 2 tablespoons (30 ml), but it keeps just about indefinitely refrigerated. Making a smaller amount risks scorching the lekvar.

Store in an airtight container: room temperature, 5 days; frozen, 6 months.

Excerpted from The Baking Bible, © 2014 by Rose Levy Beranbaum. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


5 Steps to Really Good Hamantaschen

Editor’s note 2/11/2021: The original version of this article included language that was insensitive toward Jewish food traditions and does not align with our brand’s standards. As part of our Archive Repair Project, we have edited the headline, dek, and content to better convey the history of Purim and the goals of this particular recipe. We apologize for the previous version’s flippant tone and stereotypical characterizations of Jewish culture.

Hamantaschen are a triangle-shaped cookie made during the Jewish festival of Purim, a holiday that commemorates Esther’s victory over Haman and his plot to destroy the Jewish people. Hamantaschen are shaped to resemble Haman's 3-cornered hat and traditionally stuffed with sweet fillings made of poppy seeds, dried fruits, or fruit preserves (among others). Sounds tasty, right? But achieving the right balance is not always easy to pull off.

So I set out to create a cookie that hit all the right notes: The cookie itself would be a pleasure to eat, whether or not you encountered filling in each bite. And the fillings themselves would be were after baking, but not too sweet. Here's how to nail it:

A lot of hamantaschen recipes out there call for oil or shortening in the dough in an effort to keep things pareve, or neutral. But this creates a tough, sometimes mealy dough. Some recipes even call for cream cheese, perhaps as a North American addition, perhaps just for tang. But, as is my feeling with most doughs, nothing compares to the flavor and texture of butter. I looked at several hamantaschen recipes along with our Ultimate Sugar Cookie recipe, and came up with a tender workable dough that is good enough to eat raw (I know because I ate a lot of it).

Nut filling is a bold, but delicious, choice.

The great news is you can always use jam to fill your hamantaschen. So if you're short on time or energy, just use a couple teaspoonfuls of jam or fruit preserves in the center of the dough, and that'll get the job done. But if you're after something a little more involved, we drummed up a few different options. First, a Cinnamon-Date filling. With the addition of a little bit of orange zest, this sugar-free mixture offers a soft center and caramel notes. Inspired by baklava, the Honey-Nut filling makes for great texture compared to the smooth jam-filled options. Finally, the divisive Poppy Seed filling—people either love it or they hate it—with an extra a bit of sugar and vanilla to balance the slight bitterness of the ground poppy seeds. No matter what filling you choose, use about 1½–2 teaspoons per 3 ½" cookies—and err on the safe side. In other words, start with less filling if you're switching up the sizes.


Watch the video: Tess Bakes Her Moms Favorite Hamantaschen Cookie Recipe For Purim. Slightly Kosher