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Focaccia with Tomato, Green Onion and Garlic

Focaccia with Tomato, Green Onion and Garlic


As posted on Grab a Plate

Homemade bread doesn’t have to be difficult. Think focaccia! Grab whatever toppings you like for this flat-bread, Italian specialty that is easy to make.

Focaccia is a flat bread that is similar to pizza, yet not quite the same. Olive oil, herbs and salt are popular toppings for this Italian specialty, but it’s easy to add other toppings you find appealing and that go well with bread (quite a long list that could be)!

Ready in

2 h total prep and baking

Notes

Note: You can use a standing mixer with a dough hook to mix the dough, but this was made the old-fashioned way, kneading it by hand.

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons active, quick-rising yeast
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 cups flour (for thinner dough, use 3 cups)
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cornmeal, for dusting the pan
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (for topping)
  • 1 green onion, minced (for topping)
  • 1 garlic clove, sliced thin (for topping)
  • 2 small tomatoes, diced (for topping)
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese (for topping)
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt (for topping)
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano (for topping)

Servings8

Calories Per Serving356

Folate equivalent (total)49µg12%


Onion-Tomato Focaccia

1. To make the dough, dissolve the yeast in G cup warm water and let it sit for several minutes, until it begins to bubble. Put the flour and salt in the food-processor bowl.

2. Stir together the active yeast and 2 cups lukewarm water in a spouted measuring cup. With the processor running continuously, blend the flour and salt briefly, then pour in all the liquid through the feed tube and process for about 30 seconds. A soft, moist dough should gather on the blade, with some sticking to the sides of the bowl. If it's very sticky and hasn't come off the sides at all, incorporate more flour, a tablespoon or two at a time, to stiffen the dough and bring it together. If the dough is dry, process in more water in small amounts.

3. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface, scraping the bowl and blade clean. Knead by hand for a minute, using as little flour as possible, until the dough forms a smooth round, still soft and a bit sticky. Coat a big bowl with the tablespoon of olive oil, drop in the dough, and turn it to oil it all over. Seal the bowl with plastic wrap, and let it rise in a warm place until doubled, about an hour.

4. While the dough is rising, toss together the sliced onion, cherry tomato halves, 4 tablespoons of the olive oil, and H teaspoon salt in a small bowl, and let them marinate.

5. Coat the baking dish or pan, bottom and sides, with 2 tablespoons or more olive oil. Deflate the risen dough and lay it in the pan. Gently press and stretch it into an evenly flat round that fills the pan. If the dough is resistant, let it relax for a few minutes before stretching it again.

6. Lift the marinated onion and tomatoes out of the bowl with a slotted spoon, draining off the juices. Scatter the vegetables all over the focaccia, and lightly press in with your fingertips, creating dimples in the soft dough. Finally, drizzle the marinating oil over the top.

7. Let the focaccia rise, uncovered, for about 20 minutes. Set a baking stone, if you have one, on a center oven rack and heat to 425°. Just before baking, gently dimple the dough again with your fingertips, and sprinkle another H teaspoon coarse salt all over.

8. Bake the focaccia for about 20 minutes, rotate the pan back to front for even cooking, and bake another 10 to 15 minutes, or even longer, until the bread is golden brown and the onions and tomatoes are nicely caramelized.

9. Remove the pan, drizzle another tablespoon or two of olive oil over the focaccia, and crumble the dried oregano, scattering it on top. Let the focaccia cool for at least 15 minutes before slicing. Serve it warm or at room temperature.

DEVON MAKES THE FOCACCIA

A home run here. This is a great, easy to make, not messy- to-clean-up-after recipe for bread dough. You'll love being able to use it when good bread isn't available&mdasha Wonder bread&ndashinfused vacation on the coast of Maine comes to mind. Simply whip up this dough, top it with whatever you're in the mood for, and serve it warm from the oven.

You make the dough in a food processor. The flour filled mine to the very top, and I was dubious about whether there was enough room for the two cups of water. But within seconds the whole thing had formed a very malleable dough and was ready for quick kneading.

The tomato and onion topping was very tasty, but so was a topping I made with sautéed onions and dried thyme. For that matter, when you have focaccia this good, a topping of nothing more than coarse salt and a drizzle of olive oil is wonderful.


At Panificio Fiore, the focaccia is tender on top and crispy on bottom.

Photos: Christopher Warde-Jones and Connie Miller of CB Creatives Styling: Christine Tobin

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The focaccia emerge from the oven&mdasha truck-sized stone behemoth that radiates with breathtaking intensity&mdashso quickly, the bakers at Panificio Fiore exhaust their shelves of cooling racks, forcing them to line the pans along the white tiled floor as they use a 14-foot peel to rapid-fire reload and bake the next batch.

The century-old wood-fired oven can hold 48 focaccia at once, baking them in just over 10 minutes. Even then, making hundreds a day, the workers can’t keep pace with the lunch line that twists out the tiny shop and down one of the many winding stone alleys of Bari, a thin strip of a city along the Adriatic Sea on the heel of the Italian boot. Over and again, they hand the focaccia to Antonio Fiore, whose grandfather opened the shop in 1940.

Standing at the front counter, customers blurting orders at him, Fiore tosses each foot-round focaccia onto a concave stainless steel slab&mdashdesigned to allow excess olive oil to drip away&mdashthen uses a long serrated knife to cut wedges to order, wrapping them in parchment before handing over the still-warm hunks dotted with crushed tomatoes and glistening whole green olives.

In the midst of the rush, he hands me a thick wedge, oil staining the paper and slicking my fingers. It is shockingly crispy and lightly crunchy on the bottom&mdashalmost shattering&mdashyet the top remains airy-chewy and tender, with bursts of brine and juicy sweet tomato. It is unlike any focaccia I’ve eaten, all too often singularly and unappealingly dense and doughy, lacking texture or definition. Fiore’s is rich with contrasts, fried in parts, baked in others.

With each crunchy-chewy bite I understand all the more why his focaccia recently was named the best in all of Italy. Less clear was how he managed to make it so good. And so different.

Tucked amongst the arches of Pontifical Basilica di San Nicola, Panificio Fiore occupies a former crypt that dates to at least 1508. Its white stone walls and columns are plastered with pictures of the church’s namesake St. Nicholas.

A long glass display case offers a dozen varieties of focaccia, many with wedges already hacked out. Bianca (just olives) cipolle e pomodoro (onion and tomato) melanzane e pomodoro (eggplant and tomato) patate, pomodoro e carciofi (potato, tomato and artichoke) and pomodoro, formaggio e rucola (tomato, cheese and arugula) among them. But the most popular&mdashand that which the bakers today labor at&mdashis pomodoro e olive, or tomato and olives.

Focaccia is the street food of Bari, a meal intended to be eaten immediately it is fresh for only a few hours. Fiore complains that other bakers make more and make them faster, but that’s not traditional&mdashand you can taste their shortcuts. To show me the right way, he guides me into the kitchen, where waves of heat and yeast wash over you.

As Fiore rattles off the main ingredients&mdashflour, yeast, water, salt and olive oil&mdashnothing strikes me as unusual, nothing that can account for the delicious push-and-pull of tender-crispy that makes his focaccia so memorably good. Turns out, the difference isn’t in the what, but in the how. Particularly, how long and how much.

On one side of the room, dough rises in containers the size of trash cans. The bakers&mdashall of them family&mdashhoist the buckets of dough, dumping it in large, almost oozing piles onto metal tables for portioning. The dough is tender and flabby and barely can be handled. That’s the first clue&mdashthe ratio of water to dry ingredients clearly is higher than normal.

A typical focaccia dough uses water equal to about 56 percent of the weight of flour used. Fiore’s recipe clocks in at more than 90 percent water to flour. That difference is critical because wet doughs produce weaker gluten, the protein that gives most baked goods their structure. Weak gluten tears easily, especially when all that excess moisture in the dough turns to steam in the oven. The combination creates an airy, open and more tender crumb.

An equally important difference turns out to be timing. While a typical focaccia might rise for one to two hours, Fiore’s rises for four hours, during which the dough rises, falls, then rises again, a process that leaves it looking and feeling blown out. This produces more gas than a shorter rise. Though some of that gas depletes over time&mdashresulting in less dramatic oven spring when the focaccia first hits the hot oven&mdashthe remaining gas, combined with the steam and gluten structure, creates more and larger air pockets in the dough.

The source of the crisp bottom&mdashnot merely browned, as with a pizza, but almost crackling&mdashbecomes clear as the dough is portioned into dark metal pans. Olive oil so copious it sloshes up the side of the dough goes into the pan first, effectively frying the bottom of the focaccia as the top bakes.

Back at Milk Street, adapting the recipe mostly was a matter of logistics. In the heat of Fiore’s kitchen, four hours is plenty for rising. But in significantly cooler home kitchens, we needed to let the dough go for about six hours to get similar results. And without the benefit of a wood-fired oven that can crank upward of 600°F, we needed to bake our focaccia a bit longer.

We also needed a substitute for the tomatoes. Lightly crushed cherry tomatoes offered the best flavor in place of the almost iridescent Sicilian tomatoes Fiore used. Halving them, then lightly mashing them removed some of the juices that otherwise pooled unappealingly on the surface of the focaccia. The result? Italy’s best focaccia a little closer to home.


Preparation

    1. To make the dough, dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup warm water and let it sit for several minutes, until it begins to bubble. Put the flour and salt in the food-processor bowl.
    2. Stir together the active yeast and 2 cups lukewarm water in a spouted measuring cup. With the processor running continuously, blend the flour and salt briefly, then pour in all the liquid through the feed tube and process for about 30 seconds. A soft, moist dough should gather on the blade, with some sticking to the sides of the bowl. If it’s very sticky and hasn’t come off the sides at all, incorporate more flour, a tablespoon or two at a time, to stiffen the dough and bring it together. If the dough is dry, process in more water in small amounts.
    3. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface, scraping the bowl and blade clean. Knead by hand for a minute, using as little flour as possible, until the dough forms a smooth round, still soft and a bit sticky. Coat a big bowl with the tablespoon of olive oil, drop in the dough, and turn it to oil it all over. Seal the bowl with plastic wrap, and let it rise in a warm place until doubled, about an hour.
    4. While the dough is rising, toss together the sliced onion, cherry-tomato halves, 4 tablespoons of the olive oil, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a small bowl, and let them marinate.
    5. Coat the baking dish or pan, bottom and sides, with 2 tablespoons or more olive oil. Deflate the risen dough, and lay it in the pan. Gently press and stretch it into an evenly flat round that fills the pan. If the dough is resistant, let it relax for a few minutes.
    6. Lift the marinated onion and tomatoes out of the bowl with a slotted spoon, draining off the juices. Scatter the vegetables all over the focaccia, and lightly press in with your fingertips, creating dimples in the soft dough. Finally, drizzle the marinating oil over the top.
    7. Let the focaccia rise, uncovered, for about 20 minutes. Set a baking stone, if you have one, on a center oven rack and heat to 425˚. Just before baking, gently dimple the dough again with your fingertips, and sprinkle another 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt all over.
    8. Bake the focaccia for about 20 minutes, rotate the pan back to front for even cooking, and bake another 10 to 15 minutes, or even longer, until the bread is golden brown and the onion and tomatoes are nicely caramelized.
    9. Remove the pan and top with remaining olive oil and crumbled oregano. Let the focaccia cool for at least 15 minutes before slicing. Serve it warm or at room temperature.

    From Lidia's Italy by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich. Copyright (c) 2007 by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich. Published by Knopf.

    Lidia Bastianich hosts the hugely popular PBS show, "Lidia's Italian-American Kitchen" and owns restaurants in New York City, Kansas City, and Pittsburgh. Also the author of Lidia's Italian Table and Lidia's Italian-American Kitchen, she lives in Douglaston, New York.


    Easy Green Tomato Chutney Recipe

    If you grow your own tomatoes, you know what it’s like to have a mountain of green fruit at the end of summer. This year I’m looking at an entire greenhouse full and of several different varieties. I’ll take some indoors to ripen but honestly, they’re delicious if you feel adventurous enough to cook with them. I’ve tried fried green tomatoes, green tomato pasta sauce, and green tomato ketchup before. One of the best recipes though is green tomato chutney.

    If I were to describe the flavor it would be sweet and sour, yet rich with a touch of heat. It pairs well with cheese, bread, and cured meats and is pretty much a British allotment preserve staple.

    Preserve the last of the tomatoes in delicious and easy-to-make green tomato chutney

    Making Green Tomato Chutney

    Green tomato chutney is one of the simplest and quickest preserves you can make. You literally chop the ingredients up, put them in a pot and cook them together for an hour. It’s also a great way to use up green tomatoes at the end of the season. To make it you can use small tomatoes and large and it doesn’t matter if you mix and match tomato varieties.

    Unlike other recipes, mine doesn’t use apples — it’s all about chunky pieces of onion and tomato. I also don’t bother with reducing the water content before cooking, since it evaporates off while boiling anyway. My recipe is versatile too. This year I made it with distilled white vinegar and a mix of white and brown sugars and it ended up just as delicious as ever.


    21 Green Tomato Recipes For Using Unripe Tomatoes

    Published: Sep 30, 2019 by Elizabeth Waddington · This post may contain affiliate links.

    No matter how successfully you make tomatoes ripen more quickly in your garden, chances are you will still be left with a number of green tomatoes to use up at the end of the growing season.

    The good news is, those green tomatoes do not need to go to waste.

    There are plenty of ways to use unripe tomatoes &ndash and they can be just as delicious, and perhaps more intriguing than sun-ripened fruit.

    These green tomato recipes from around the web should give you a good place to start when concocting your own range of delicious green tomato based dishes:

    1. Fried Green Tomatoes

    Fried green tomatoes are a classic.

    Simply slice green tomatoes that are fully sized but not yet ripened fully and coat each slice in egg and flour, cornmeal and breadcrumbs. Season them to taste with salt and pepper and then fry them up in a pan.

    This traditional breakfast favourite can actually be enjoyed at any time of day, and heated up with a little spice or hot sauce if you like more intense flavor.

    2. Pickled Green Tomatoes

    Pickling green tomatoes is a great way to make a tangy, slightly sweet, slightly spicy treat that can be used in much the same way as bread and butter pickles.

    This recipe shows you a way to quick pickle your green tomatoes for consuming in the next few weeks, but also reveals how you can process them for winter storage, too.

    3. Green Tomato Fritters

    Another way to fry up those green tomatoes is in fritters. Simply combine fresh green tomatoes with a batter mix of your choosing &ndash like the spiced chickpea flour and rice flour batter described in the recipe in the link below.

    Fritters are also a great way to use up a range of other late-season fruits and vegetables from your garden.

    4. Fried Green Tomato Burritos

    You can add green tomato slices to a wide range of wraps and sandwiches. Why not mix things up a little and make some delicious fried green tomato burritos?

    This recipe is a step up from the basic burritos you might find for sale on some street corner, and you will have the added satisfaction of knowing that you made it using produce you grew yourself.

    5. Green Tomato Chutney

    No matter how busy you get in the kitchen cooking home-made meals each night, you may still find that you have too many green tomatoes to use up right away.

    The good news is that there are a number of ways to preserve your harvest and make those green tomatoes last longer.

    Green tomato chutney is a great place to start.

    Make some of this and you can enjoy the zingy taste of green tomatoes all year round.

    6. Zingy Green Tomato Salsa

    Another way to preserve your green tomatoes for longer, or simply to use up a lot of them in one go, is to make some green tomato salsa to accompany a wide range of different dishes &ndash from burgers and sandwiches to wraps and tacos.

    7. Green Tomato Ketchup

    If you are a &ldquoketchup with everything&rdquo sort of family, then what better way to use up those green tomatoes than by using them to make this handy condiment.

    Mix up your end of season tomatoes with honey, vinegar, onions and spices.

    The great thing about this recipe is that you can easily customise it to suit your own particular tastes &ndash making it sweeter, or spicier as required.

    8. Green Tomato Shakshuka

    You can use either green tomatoes or tomatillos in this shakshuka recipe.

    Sometimes also referred to as &lsquoeggs in purgatory&rsquo, this fiery dish combines eggs with a base mix of tomatoes, garlic, chillies, and other seasoning.

    Great for breakfast, or later in the day, this is another dish that is easily customised to suit your tastes &ndash make it as mild or as hot as you like &ndash however spicy you like it, the green tomatoes will lend the dish a pleasing, zesty, lemon-like flavour.

    9. Green Tomato Curry

    World cuisine offers plenty of inspiration when it comes to making full use of the green tomatoes from your garden.

    Another idea for a flavoursome dish is to make some sort of curry from your green tomatoes. You can use them in a wide range of different curries. The example below is a great option, which is inspired by Thai cuisine.

    10. Green Tomato Chilli

    You could also consider adding green tomatoes to a chilli. The recipe linked to below is for meat eaters, but you could easily also substitute the ground beef for a vegan and vegetarian friendly option, or omit the mince altogether and simply use some beans.

    As with other spicy options on this list, you can make your chilli as mild or as hot as you want.

    11. Green Tomato Stew

    Stews are a wonderful way to use up a wide range of produce from your garden, and green tomatoes work wonderfully in a range of different stew recipes.

    This is another great fall warmer that will go well with some rice and other Asian inspired side dishes. And this recipe is vegan friendly too, and is a surprisingly creamy dish that anyone can enjoy.

    12. Green Tomato Casserole

    You can also pop your green tomatoes and other ingredients into an oven proof dish and concoct a casserole to suit your tastes.

    You can layer up a wide range of different vegetables with your green tomatoes if you have them on hand, and layer them up with a creamy or cheesy sauce (or vegan alternatives) to bring out their flavour.

    13. Green Tomato Parmesan Bake

    A green tomato parmesan bake, or parmesan-crusted green tomato gratin is another way to make the most of the flavour of your green tomatoes in an oven baked dish.

    This is a recipe that looks impressive, though it is surprisingly easy to make, and the flavours of the green tomatoes, caramelized onions and parmesan complement each other perfectly.

    14. Green Tomato Pasta

    Another very easy way to use up some of your green tomatoes is in a pasta dish.

    The green tomatoes lend pasta dishes a very different flavour from their redder, ripe relatives, which can allow you to ring the changes when it comes to Italian cuisine and try something a little bit different.

    15. Green Tomato Pizza

    Speaking of Italian cuisine, you could also consider adding your green tomatoes to a pizza base for a different take on the family favourite.

    You do not have to stick to the traditional red tomato sauce and cheddar or mozzarella cheese.

    You could also consider trying something a little different &ndash pizza purists look away now &ndash this pizza suggestion below combines green tomatoes with pesto and feta and mozzarella.

    16. Green Tomato Focaccia Sandwiches

    Staying with the Italian theme, another option is to use green tomatoes in focaccia bread, or layered into a focaccia sandwich as in the recipe below.

    A bread base infused with garlicky olive oil and dotted with green tomatoes and perhaps other Mediterranean vegetables and herbs can be delicious, or, more simply, you can simply grill some tomatoes and place them in your sandwich.

    This option has bacon &ndash but you could make this a veggie option too.

    17. Green Tomato Frittata

    Another delightfully easy light lunch or mid-week meal to make with your green tomatoes is a light and airy frittata.

    Combine the eggs (from your own free rangers if you have some) with green tomatoes and pretty much whatever other herbs and veggies you have to hand.

    18. Green Tomato Quiche

    Another way to use up your green tomatoes (and eggs) is to make a delicious quiche.

    Of course there are a huge range of quiche recipes out there &ndash both crustless and with crust, depending on your preferences.

    The green tomato quiche in the recipe below is a simple version, but you can customise this recipe to include other herbs or vegetables that might be available.

    19. Green Tomato Tart

    If you do fancy trying your hand at some pastry (and really want to impress your family and friends) then you could consider making a delicious tart using some of the green tomatoes from your garden.

    The fried green tomato tart in the recipe below is a great way to showcase their flavour &ndash and it looks good too, so could be an impressive addition for a dinner party.

    20. Green Tomato Cake

    You might be surprised to learn that green tomatoes are not only good in savoury dishes, but can also be used to make a range of delicious desserts.

    One option is to make a tasty green tomato cake, such as the one in the recipe below.

    21. Green Tomato Pie

    Another great green tomato dessert option is a green tomato pastry pie &ndash similar to a traditional apple pie and something to surprise your friends with. They&rsquoll never be able to guess that you made this sweet and flavoursome pie with the unripe tomatoes from your garden.

    These are just some of the many ways to prevent waste and use up all those unripe green tomatoes from your garden.

    Elizabeth Waddington is a writer, permaculture designer and green living consultant. She is a practical, hands-on gardener, with a background in philosophy: (an MA in English-Philosophy from St Andrews University). She has long had an interest in ecology, gardening and sustainability and is fascinated by how thought can generate action, and ideas can generate positive change.

    In 2014, she and her husband moved to their forever home in the country. She graduated from allotment gardening to organically managing 1/3 of an acre of land, including a mature fruit orchard,which she has turned into a productive forest garden. The yield from the garden is increasing year on year – rapidly approaching an annual weight in produce of almost 1 ton.

    She has filled the rest of the garden with a polytunnel, a vegetable patch, a herb garden, a wildlife pond, woodland areas and more. Since moving to the property she has also rescued many chickens from factory farms, keeping them for their eggs, and moved much closer to self-sufficiency. She has made many strides in attracting local wildlife and increasing biodiversity on the site.

    When she is not gardening, Elizabeth spends a lot of time working remotely on permaculture garden projects around the world. Amongst other things, she has designed private gardens in regions as diverse as Canada, Minnesota, Texas, the Arizona/California desert, and the Dominican Republic, commercial aquaponics schemes, food forests and community gardens in a wide range of global locations.

    In addition to designing gardens, Elizabeth also works in a consultancy capacity, offering ongoing support and training for gardeners and growers around the globe. She has created booklets and aided in the design of Food Kits to help gardeners to cool and warm climates to grow their own food, for example. She is undertaking ongoing work for NGO Somalia Dryland Solutions and a number of other non governmental organisations, and works as an environmental consultant for several sustainable companies.


    Recipe of Italian Bruschetta with Onion & Tomato (Indian version) – Step by step

    Cut the bread into slices. The bread slice should not be too thin or too thick. Here I have used french baguette bread. You can use normal wheat bread slices instead. Just cut the wheat bread slices into semi circles to give bruschetta its traditional shape.

    To make onion tomato topping for “Indianized” version of Italian bruschetta we will need following ingredients. Finely chopped tomato, finely chopped onion, garlic and green chilies. We will also need olive oil and some Italian dry herbs like oregano or pizza mix.

    Lets prepare the topping now. In a non-stick pan heat olive oil and saute garlic for only 20-30 secs.

    Now add finely chopped green chilies and mix it well.

    Next add finely chopped onions. Saute only for 1 min till onions become translucent.

    Add dried basil leaves (or even fresh if you have).

    Give a stir and mix well dry herbs with onion.

    Add finely chopped tomatoes and salt as per your taste and again stir fry quickly just for a minute.

    The onion tomato topping for bruschetta is ready. Apply olive oil on bread slices and top it up with the onion tomato topping.

    Pre-heat the oven on 210 degree C. Place the bread slices in oven and cook for around 15 minutes. Yummy bruschetta is ready to serve.


    Recipe Summary

    • 1 cup water
    • 3 cups bread flour
    • 2 tablespoons dry milk powder
    • 3 ½ tablespoons white sugar
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 3 tablespoons margarine
    • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
    • ½ cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
    • 2 teaspoons dried rosemary, crushed
    • 1 teaspoon garlic salt
    • 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

    Place water, flour, powdered milk, sugar, salt, butter or margarine, tomatoes, and yeast into bread machine in the order suggested by the manufacturer. Set to Dough cycle, and start the machine. Dough will be 1/2 pound.

    When the bread machine has finished the Dough cycle, take the dough out. Knead for 1 minute by hand. Place in an oiled bowl, and turn a few times to coat the surface of the dough. Cover with a damp cloth, and let rise for 15 minutes in a warm place.

    Dust a 10 x 15 inch baking tray with cornmeal. Roll out dough to fit the pan. Make indentations in the dough with your finger tips. Brush top surface with oil, and cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise for 30 minutes.

    Sprinkle with parmesan, rosemary, garlic salt, and mozzarella.

    Bake at 400 degree F (205 degrees C) for 15 minutes, or until nicely browned. Cool slightly, and cut into squares for serving.


    • 3 to 4 large Roma tomatoes (about 1 pound), seeded, sliced and diced small
    • 1/4 to 1/2 cup diced (red or white) onion, diced small (same size as the tomatoes)
    • 1 small to medium jalapeño pepper, diced finely, (about 1 tablespoon minced)
    • 1 clove of garlic, smashed, peeled and minced
    • 2 green onions, sliced and coarsely chopped
    • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
    • the juice from a half a lime
    • 1 teaspoon of olive oil (optional)
    • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste
    1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl and toss until combined.
    2. Serve immediately, or cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
    3. Serve with tortilla chips, as garnish to your favorite chili, on top of your favorite fajitas or tacos!

    Nutrition Information:

    Yield:

    Serving Size:

    All information presented on this site is intended for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and any nutritional information shared on SimplyScratch.com should only be used as a general guideline.

    Buy the Cookbook: Simply Scratch : 120 Wholesome Homemade Recipes Made Easy Now available on Amazon »
    THANK YOU in advance for your support!


    Recipe Summary

    • 8 cups Smoked Pork Stock
    • 3 pounds collard greens, stems and ribs removed
    • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • 3 medium onions, coarsely chopped (about 2 cups)
    • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
    • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
    • Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, drained

    In a large pot, bring pork stock to a boil over medium-high heat. Add greens and cook until tender, 15 to 40 minutes drain, reserving stock.

    Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onions and season with salt and pepper cook, stirring, until soft and translucent, 5 to 6 minutes. Add garlic and red pepper flakes cook, stirring, 2 to 3 minutes.

    Add tomatoes and cook, breaking up with the back of a spoon, for 10 minutes. Add cooked greens and 2 cups of reserved stock simmer until heated through, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper serve.